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  2. Miss Pacific Fleet (Warner Brothers, 1935)

    Starring Joan Blondell, Glenda Farrell, Hugh Herbert, Eddie Acuff, Marie Wilson. Directed by Ray Enright.

     
  3. The Long Voyage Home (United Artists, 1940)

    Starring John Wayne, Thomas Mitchell, Ian Hunter, Barry Fitzgerald, Wilfred Lawson, Mildred Natwick, John Qualen, Ward Bond, Arthur Shields, Joe Sawyer, J.M. Kerrigan, Rafaela Ottiano, Carmen Morales, and Constantine Romanoff. Directed by John Ford.

     
  4. Action in the North Atlantic (Warner Brothers, 1943)

    Starring Humphrey Bogart, Raymond Massey, Alan Hale, Julie Bishop, Ruth Gordon, Sam Levene, Dane Clark, Peter Whitney, Dick Hogan, Louis Adlon, Kirk Alyn, Virginia Christine, Donald Douglas, Charles Trowbridge. Directed by Lloyd Bacon, Byron Haskin and Raoul Walsh.

     
  5. Destroyer (Columbia, 1943)

    Starring Edward G. Robinson, Glenn Ford, Marguerite Chapman, Edgar Buchanan, Leo Gorcey, Regis Toomey, Edward Brophy, and Lloyd Bridges.

     
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  7. Moontide (20th Century Fox, 1942)

    Starring Jean Gabin, Ida Lupino, Thomas Mitchell, Claude Rains

    Forced to flee Paris during the Occupation, the great French leading man Jean Gabin starred in a brace of Hollywood films, the best of which was the first, 20th Century-Fox’s Moontide. Cast to type, Gabin plays Bobo, a brooding itinerant dock-worker who gets mixed up in a drunken brawl. Upon awakening, Bobo is convinced by his mercenary “pal” Tiny (Thomas Mitchell) that he has killed a man.

    Despairing at the thought of having committed murder, not to mentioned being blackmailed for the rest of his life by the treacherous Tiny, Bobo is able to find a few fleeting moments of happiness with Anna (Ida Lupino), a suicidal young girl whom he has saved from a watery grave.

    The intensity of the love scenes may well be due to the allegedly real-life romance between Jean Gabin and Ida Lupino. Novelist John O’Hara adapted the screenplay from a book by actor Willard Robertson.

    almovie

     
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  9. Lobsters Are Now Ruthless, Cannibal Savages

    As an experiment, Noah Oppenheim, a marine biology graduate student at the University of Maine, attached a waterproof, infrared camera to the head of a young lobster. As evening set in, he saw sights that cannot be unseen (but can be seen by you in the video below). Lobsters eating lobsters.

    Oppenheim says this is the first time that researchers have seen lobster cannibalism so rampantly in the wild. Lobsters are known for chomping on each other while in captivity (that’s why they wear those stylin’ rubber bands around their claws as they paw at the glass in grocery store tanks). Basically, they have been around for approximately 139 million years, so they know how the fuck to survive. They will eat their closest friend and only companion.

    keep reading on Gawker

     
     
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  11. Carry On Cruising (1962)Carry On Jack (1963)

    Don’t ask, don’t even start…

    Miss Monkey’s British beau strongly encouraged her to watch this series of filmssome time ago. Good Times were guaranteed. After 30 minutes or so of one of these hallucinogenic horror dreams, I hit the kill switch with extreme prejudice. I think it was supposed to be about the French Revolution, I have tried earnestly to force it from my mind.

    I would have gladly, no — Delightedlyleft them out altogether except a certain someone “threw his teddy out of the cot”, “pitched a wobbly” and was otherwise being a mardy git, which in the land of pervy, warm-beer-drinking, bare-knuckle fighting, malnourished pygmy people means “had a shit fit” and insisted I include them.

    carryonjackThe Carry On series was a long-running sequence of 31 low-budget British comedy motion pictures produced between 1958 and 1992, all made at Pinewood Studios; often cleverly shot on the same sets and using leftover props and costumes from major Pinewood productions. While many of them parodied more serious films, the series’ humour relied largely on innuendo, double entendre, and the sending-up of British institutions and customs.

    Peter Rogers and Gerald Thomas were the sole producer and director respectively and mostly employed the same crew and a regular group of actors. Next to the James Bond films, they are the second-longest continually-running UK film series.

    Penelope Gilliatt opined, “The usual charge to make against the Carry On films is to say that they could be so much better done. This is true enough. They look dreadful, they seem to be edited with a bacon slicer, the effects are perfunctory and the comic rhythm jerks along like a cat on a cold morning. But if all these things were more elegant I don’t really think the films would be more enjoyable: the badness is part of the funniness.”

    These movies are just plain moronic. Second only to Half Man, Half Biscuit, the Carry Onfilms are the single worst form of entertainment ever exported from the UK.

    Maritime Monday for July 22nd, 2013:
    Summer Movie Guide, Part II: Romance and Adventure on the High Seas!

     
  12. (via mudwerks)

    Tagged #sea shell
     
  13. Sealed Cargo (RKO, 1951)

    Based on The Gaunt Woman, a novel by Edmund Gilligan.

    Really interesting plot! Read the wikipedia page.

     
  14. Northern Pursuit (Warner Brothers, 1949) Italian movie poster

    Flynn is cast as a Canadian Mountie assigned to track down and capture downed Nazi pilot Hugo von Keller (Helmut Dantine) in the frozen Hudson Bay region.

    Once Wagner and fellow Mountie Jim Austin, (John Ridgely) catch up with Von Keller they pretend to be on his side, hoping he’ll reveal his espionage plans.

    Taken in by the ruse, Von Keller leads the mounties to a secret Nazi hideaway where the Germans have hidden a huge bomber they plan to use against North America… +

     
  15. Run Silent, Run Deep (United Artists, 1958). Three Sheet