1.  lithograph: Sebastopol from the sea - sketched from the deck of HMS Sidon

    "Print shows sailors and cannons on deck of the H.M.S. Sidon, with a distant view of the forts and other buildings in Sevastopol."

    Bibliodyssey: The Crimean War

     
  2. 1912 WHITE STAR LINE ‘TITANIC’ ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF SYMPATHY

    mailed Tuesday April 23, 1912, little more than a week after the ‘Titanic’ sank, and only a few days after survivors arrived in New York. Card, no doubt sent in response to cabled messages, addressed to Brighton German Bank of Cincinnati, OH, and reads: ‘The White Star Line most gratefully acknowledges the expression of your deep sympathy, and shares with you profound sorrow for all to whom the loss of the S.S. “Titanic” has brought great bereavement.’

     
  3. Soviet Navy’s Pacific Fleet sailor in full dress.

    The telnyashka (Russian: тельня́шка) is a white undershirt horizontally striped in various colors, and dates back to the 19th century Tsarist Navy.

    It is an iconic uniform garment worn by the Russian Navy and the Russian  Naval Infantry (marines).

    The telnyashkas originated with distinctive striped blouses worn by the merchants and fishermen of Brittany.

    The fashion was later adopted and popularized by the French Navy and other navies of the pre-Dreadnought era.

    Telnyashka has become such evident symbol of masculinity in Soviet culture, that it is sported by dozens of popular non-military characters of the cinema and even children’ cartoons. There is a popular saying that describes the wearing of telnyashkas as an indicator of a “real man”; "We are few in number, but we wear telnyashkas!"

     
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  5. The British Library has released over a million images onto Flickr Commons for anyone to use, remix and repurpose.

    These images were taken from the pages of 17th, 18th and 19th century books and concern a startling mix of subjects.

    There are maps, geological diagrams, beautiful illustrations, comical satire, illuminated and decorative letters, colourful illustrations, landscapes, wall-paintings and so much more… keep reading

    Image taken from The Two Hemispheres: A Popular Account of the Countries and Peoples of the World … Illustrated, etc.; 1885

     
  6. Crewmen of the USS Monitor pose on the deck of their ironclad ship in July 1862.

    In 1862, the USS Monitor — a Civil War-era ironclad warship — fought one of the world’s first iron-armored battles against the Confederate ironclad CSS Virginia. Less than a year later, a violent storm sank the Union ship off the coast of Cape Hatteras, N.C. The wreck was discovered more than a century later, and subsequent searches have turned up more than just a crumbling ship — they also found the skeletons of two of the Monitor’s sailors in the ship’s gun turret.  (more)

     
  7. La Crue de la Seine, Janvier 1910, Ce qui reste du quai de Grenelle

    In late January 1910, following months of high rainfall, the Seine River flooded Paris when water pushed upwards from overflowing sewers and subway tunnels, and seeped into basements through fully saturated soil. The waters did not overflow the river’s banks within the city, but flooded Paris through tunnels, sewers, and drains.

    Once water invaded the Gare d’Orsay rail terminal, its tracks soon sat under more than a metre of water. To continue moving throughout the city, residents traveled by boat or across a series of wooden walkways built by government engineers and by Parisians themselves.

    On 28 January the water reached its maximum height at 8.62 metres (28.28 feet), some 6 m above its normal level.

    The water got to its highest after 10 days and after 35 days the water was gone completely.

    1910 Great Flood of Paris

     
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  9. The Tidal Wave (Thomsen-Ellis Corp., Baltimore-New York, 1918) WWI Poster

    by Joseph Clement Coll (1881 -1921), a prolific magazine illustrator who was one of the earliest to work in the new medium of unengraved drawings. His thousands of illustrations in a host of periodicals is said to have had a profound influence on the pulp magazine artists of the 1930s and 40s.

     
  10. colortransparency:

    Landing on the Moon - July 20, 1969

    A picture someone took of their television on July 20, 1969 during the Moon landing.

    (via thepieshops)

     
  11. "Old Ironsides" in Winter Quarters at San Diego

    San Diego has been exceptionally honored
    by the Department of the United States Navy
    because of the selection of this city as the
    temporary ‘home port’ of the famous frigate
    Constitution.

    This living tradition of our country will
    be berthed at the Navy Pier, foot of Broad-
    way, until March 15th and may be visited any
    day between the house of 10:00 a.m. and 5:00
    p.m. including Sundays. No charge for admission.

    The history of the Constitution is replete
    with heroic exploits. Conceived by George
    Washington, the keel was laid in 1794 and ship
    launched in 1797. Participated in 42 battles,
    winning every one of them.

    Reconstructed in part by money freely
    given by American school children the Con-
    stitution is a national shrine. She has been
    visited by 4,512,299 persons. 1,542,423 in California alone.

    This will probably be the last opportunity
    to visit ‘Old Ironsides’ at a Pacific coast
    port, according to her Commander, Louis J.
    Gulliver. See this gallant ship restored exactly as she was in her fighting glory.”

    Old Ironsides" was in San Diego in the winter of 1933.

    (Source: adventures-of-the-blackgang, via thingsihappentolike)

     
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  13. Bovril had been a staple in pantries all over France and Britain for generations.  It should come as no surprise, then, that when London found itself with a massive deadly human waste build up in the Thames, the vessels that came to the rescue were aptly dubbed the “Bovril boats”.

    Bovril boats, also known as sludge vessels, were specially designed sewerage dumping ships. The vessels were well maintained, and crews could expect reasonably good pay and regular work.

    In 1887 the first ship of a long line of ‘pump and dump’ effluent tanker vessels was launched.

    Their task was to remove London’s sludge waste from Beckton and Crossness Pumping Stations for disposal on the ebb tide at sea in the Black Deep, an extremely deep channel in the North Sea, located fifteen miles off the aptly named Foulness Island.

    The dreadful state of the Thames near the sewer outfalls was highlighted by the SS Princess Alice disaster of September 1878.

    Maritime Monday for July 8th, 2013:

    It Puts BEEF Into You!

     
  14. Discovery in doubt

    On April 19, 1770, after mapping the entire coastline of New Zealand, British explorer James Cook (1728-1779) became the first white man to reach Australia.

    Or did he?

    A skull discovered in Taree, New South Wales, calls that into question because it belonged to a Caucasian who predated Captain Cook by a century…

    keep reading on Quigley’s Cabinet

     
  15. Sir William Hillary came to live on the Isle of Man in 1808. Being aware of the treacherous nature of the Irish Sea, with many ships being wrecked around the Manx coast, he drew up plans for a national lifeboat service manned by trained crews.

    Initially he received little response from the Admiralty. However, on appealing to the more philanthropic members of London society, the plans were adopted and, with the help of two Members of Parliament, the National Institution for the Preservation of Life from Shipwreck was founded in 1824.

    Maritime Monday for July 1st, 2013:
    Rock the Boat