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  2. Man Proposes, God Disposes by Edwin Henry Landseer, 1864

    more: Franklin’s Lost Expedition

     
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  5. World War I (Emergency Fleet Corp., 1917). Propaganda Poster  "Send the Eagle’s Answer: More Ships"

    In 1916 the United States Shipping Board was created with the charter to build up the US Merchant Marine as Europe went further and further into war. The Emergency Fleet Corporation in Washington, DC, commissioned artist James Daugherty to create this poster to spur worker productivity in shipbuilding.

     
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  7.  lithograph: Sebastopol from the sea - sketched from the deck of HMS Sidon

    "Print shows sailors and cannons on deck of the H.M.S. Sidon, with a distant view of the forts and other buildings in Sevastopol."

    Bibliodyssey: The Crimean War

     
  8. 1912 WHITE STAR LINE ‘TITANIC’ ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF SYMPATHY

    mailed Tuesday April 23, 1912, little more than a week after the ‘Titanic’ sank, and only a few days after survivors arrived in New York. Card, no doubt sent in response to cabled messages, addressed to Brighton German Bank of Cincinnati, OH, and reads: ‘The White Star Line most gratefully acknowledges the expression of your deep sympathy, and shares with you profound sorrow for all to whom the loss of the S.S. “Titanic” has brought great bereavement.’

     
  9. Soviet Navy’s Pacific Fleet sailor in full dress.

    The telnyashka (Russian: тельня́шка) is a white undershirt horizontally striped in various colors, and dates back to the 19th century Tsarist Navy.

    It is an iconic uniform garment worn by the Russian Navy and the Russian  Naval Infantry (marines).

    The telnyashkas originated with distinctive striped blouses worn by the merchants and fishermen of Brittany.

    The fashion was later adopted and popularized by the French Navy and other navies of the pre-Dreadnought era.

    Telnyashka has become such evident symbol of masculinity in Soviet culture, that it is sported by dozens of popular non-military characters of the cinema and even children’ cartoons. There is a popular saying that describes the wearing of telnyashkas as an indicator of a “real man”; "We are few in number, but we wear telnyashkas!"

     
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  11. The British Library has released over a million images onto Flickr Commons for anyone to use, remix and repurpose.

    These images were taken from the pages of 17th, 18th and 19th century books and concern a startling mix of subjects.

    There are maps, geological diagrams, beautiful illustrations, comical satire, illuminated and decorative letters, colourful illustrations, landscapes, wall-paintings and so much more… keep reading

    Image taken from The Two Hemispheres: A Popular Account of the Countries and Peoples of the World … Illustrated, etc.; 1885

     
  12. Crewmen of the USS Monitor pose on the deck of their ironclad ship in July 1862.

    In 1862, the USS Monitor — a Civil War-era ironclad warship — fought one of the world’s first iron-armored battles against the Confederate ironclad CSS Virginia. Less than a year later, a violent storm sank the Union ship off the coast of Cape Hatteras, N.C. The wreck was discovered more than a century later, and subsequent searches have turned up more than just a crumbling ship — they also found the skeletons of two of the Monitor’s sailors in the ship’s gun turret.  (more)

     
  13. La Crue de la Seine, Janvier 1910, Ce qui reste du quai de Grenelle

    In late January 1910, following months of high rainfall, the Seine River flooded Paris when water pushed upwards from overflowing sewers and subway tunnels, and seeped into basements through fully saturated soil. The waters did not overflow the river’s banks within the city, but flooded Paris through tunnels, sewers, and drains.

    Once water invaded the Gare d’Orsay rail terminal, its tracks soon sat under more than a metre of water. To continue moving throughout the city, residents traveled by boat or across a series of wooden walkways built by government engineers and by Parisians themselves.

    On 28 January the water reached its maximum height at 8.62 metres (28.28 feet), some 6 m above its normal level.

    The water got to its highest after 10 days and after 35 days the water was gone completely.

    1910 Great Flood of Paris

     
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  15. The Tidal Wave (Thomsen-Ellis Corp., Baltimore-New York, 1918) WWI Poster

    by Joseph Clement Coll (1881 -1921), a prolific magazine illustrator who was one of the earliest to work in the new medium of unengraved drawings. His thousands of illustrations in a host of periodicals is said to have had a profound influence on the pulp magazine artists of the 1930s and 40s.